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Tag Archives: Expat in Serbia

Bosnia & Herzogovina Village/Town/City Names Translated to English


 

 

If you are one of the lucky folks who have had a chance to visit the  little Balkan county of Bosnia & Herzegovina, you know how beautiful it is. The rolling hills, untouched forests, crystal clear streams, delicious food, diverse population, historic sites, and friendly people make it a vacationer’s delight.

Bosnia & Herzegovina does have it’s oddities. It has three presidents and is divided into two sections:   Republika Srpska (Majority Serb)is one of two constitutional and legal entities of Bosnia and Herzegovina, the other being the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Majority Bosnjak/Bosniak/Bosnian Muslim). The entities are largely autonomous with Banja Luka being the capital of Republika Srpska and Sarajevo being the capital of the Federation.

Enough of the talk, let’s get to the meat of this article. My buddy, Hristof Romanic, made a map of Serbia with funny English translations a few months ago. It went over so well that he decided to make one for his homeland of Bosnia & Herzegovina. It was made to make people laugh and to show some of the funny translations that exist in village/town and city names. We know that more professional translations exist, but this is made for comedic purposes. Grab a coffee, relax and enjoy!

17888785_1528178733881410_1652437158_nGornji Smrtići (Upper Death’s People)

Tišina (Silence)

Brčko (Splattered)

Bijeljina (Whiteness)

Ćele (Bald Men)

Bogovci (God’s People)

Brka (Mustache Guy)

Banja Luka (Spa Port)

Pjanići (Drunk People)

Stijena (D. Johnson “The Rock”)

Teslić (Small Tesla)

Tuzla (Here Evil)

Popovi (Priests)

Donja Kozica (Lower Little Goat)

Zavidovići (People Who Envy)

Debelo Brdo (Fat Hill)

Jajce (Small Egg)

Zenica (Pupil)

Ekonomija (Economy)

Motike (Hoes)

Babino Selo (Granny’s Village)

Kakanj (Shi**er)

Smrtići (Death’s People)

Zlosela (Evil Villages)

Dobrići (Good People)

Sarajevo (Sarah Is A Bull)

Rat (War) Ponor (Abyss)

Višegrad (More City)

Pale (Burning) Mokronoge (Wet Legs)

Rujan (September)

Mostar (Brigder)

Kukavice (Cowards)

Male Budalice (Little Fools)

Biograd (It Was City)

Obzir (Consideration)

Mesari (Butchers)

 

 

Do you like me so much that you feel like donating? I do accept tips! 🙂 Everyone has told me for years that I should put a donation button on my blog, but I think it makes you lose credibility. I’ve been talking about Serbia for nearly 7 years and have only done it out of love, but if you are so dead set on giving me a tip, I promise I’ll use it wisely. 🙂  My Paypal is charlesserbia@gmail.com. 

 
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Posted by on May 8, 2017 in Through my eyes

 

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American Expat in Serbia: What I Miss About the USA


Many folks will say ” Charles, You are an American in Serbia for over 6 years now. What do you miss the most about the USA?”. If I had to make a list of things that I miss about my life in the US, it would look something like this:

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1. Being on the same continent as your family and old friends

It’s very hard to be away from home when a tragedy hits. I’ve been unable to attend the funeral of an old friend, the funerals of some family members and the funerals of some of my friends’ family members. I’ve also missed some very important weddings, birthdays and reunions all while living 8k kilometers from home. I get cheap airline tickets because of my job, but 600 euros is still a lot to shell out when you live in Serbia. That amount nearly covers 4 months of my rent and bills.

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2. English language

It’s not always easy being an American expat in a country where English isn’t the native language. There are times when I get so absolutely frustrated with myself for not being able to explain some simple thing to someone. It’s annoying to have to buy a newspaper and slowly translate the meanings in your head. The same is true with listening to the radio or news broadcasts. It’s also tough to be sitting on a bus or waiting in a line and not being able to fully “shoot the shit” with the person next to you. When I’m sitting in a public place, I tend to let Serbian language blur together but the second I hear an English conversation, my ears perk up and I find myself eavesdropping on them. It’s my fault for not being fluent at this time, but i’m working on it.

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3. Mexican food and convenient fast food places

I absolutely adore Tex-Mex cuisine. It’s different from the authentic Mexican food that I had while living in Mexico for 1.5 years as it’s more aimed at American taste buds. There isn’t much that can beat a chicken chimichanga smothered in cheese sauce with a nice margarita and nacho chips. We have very few Mexican restaurants in Serbia. They are pretty good, but the taste just isn’t the same. I also miss having an unlimited supply of fast food places like : Wendy’s, Subway, Taco Bell, Burger King, Rally’s, and the buffet places like Denny’s, IHOP, etc. Serbian rostilj is super duper in taste and quality, but I like being able to eat a different fast food place each day. That’s what us fat folks enjoy .

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4. Clothing that fits

Serbian people don’t have an issue with obesity. The vast majority of the population is always out walking around town, riding bikes, and not just sitting on their butts eating junk food. That being said, it’s hard for a chubby (200lb) guy like myself to find shirts  that fit. I can walk into 5 or 6 different clothing stores and find very few shirts that will comfortably fit me. The fashion over here is slim fit EVERYTHING! Slim fit looks good on those who have a six pack, but it doesn’t on those of us with a barrel. It’s also annoying to buy pants in most of the stores here because the legs are way too tight and they have limited length sizes. You can’t usually find 29″ or 30″ with a size 34 waist. You have to buy them longer and bring them to a little store for a lady to cut them and hem them up. I had the same problems in Mexico. When you complain to a Serbian or a Mexican about it, they think you are nuts or just plain lazy. I like to buy something that’s ready to wear, not something I have to have altered.

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5. Free public toilets

If you are from the US, you are probably scratching your head at this one. You take for granted the ability to stop at any fast food place or public toilet and go without paying a silly fee. It’s not like it’s a lot of money, but it’s the principle of the thing. You must purchase something at McDonalds in Serbia so you can get a restroom code to open the door. If you go to the bus station or any other public toilet, you must pay some Gypsy person 40-80 dinars to use a filthy bathroom.

With all that being said, I would still rather live in Serbia. It’s a more cheerful,lively, fun, relaxed and enjoyable place. It doesn’t matter how small the town is, they have outdoor cafe after outdoor cafe, large walking streets for pedestrians only, people walking and biking at all hours of the day or night, quality food, nightlife that goes 24/7 Mon-Sun, beautiful people, and no strict laws on smoking and drinking in public.

Do you like me so much that you feel like donating? I do accept tips! 🙂 Everyone has told me for years that I should put a donation button on my blog, but I think it makes you lose credibility. I’ve been talking about Serbia for nearly 7 years and have only done it out of love, but if you are so dead set on giving me a tip, I promise I’ll use it wisely. 🙂  My Paypal is charlesserbia@gmail.com. 
 
2 Comments

Posted by on May 7, 2017 in Through my eyes, USA vs Serbia

 

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